Publication: Risk factors associated with long term survival from breast cancer in far north Queensland

Risk factors associated with long term survival from breast cancer in far north Queensland.
Ho-Huynh AH, Elston TE, Gunnarsson RG, de Costa AD.
Brisbane: Queensland RACS paper prize presentation; 2018.

Abstract

The aim of the present study is to investigate how tumour, patient, and treatment-related factors are associated with survival outcomes for women diagnosed with breast cancer in Far North Queensland. This was a retrospective longitudinal study of all women diagnosed at Cairns Hospital with their first episode of breast cancer between 1999-2013. Factors independently associated with mortality for women with any type of breast cancer and for women with invasive cancer were identified using multivariate Cox regression. Standard linear regression and logistic regression were used to identify any correlation between demographic factors and late presentation. Increased risk of breast cancer death was associated with increased tumour size and absence of progesterone receptor for women with any type of breast cancer and with increased tumour size, tumour grade, absence of progesterone receptor and axillary node positive for women with invasive cancer. Five and ten-year absolute survival was 0.90 and 0.86 respectively. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, remoteness of area of residence, and socioeconomic status was not found to be associated with more advanced disease at presentation. The effect of the classical risk factors on breast cancer mortality outweigh the effects of other factors, including those related to patient demographics.


, from James Cook University
http://au.researchweb.org/is/jcu/user/publication?ref=3055711