Publication: What happened to the prescriptions? A study of compliance and a telephone call as an intervention

What happened to the prescriptions? A study of compliance and a telephone call as an intervention
Hagström B, gunnarsson R, Mattsson B.
London: WONCA Europe 2002; 2002.

Abstract

Background Patient non-compliance with medical regimens is a major obstacle in achieving control of cardiovascular diseases. Redeeming of prescriptions must be high and that is especially medications for chronic diseases. Objektives To determine the rate of patients not filling their prescriptions after a visit to a general practitioner (GP) and to assess whether a phone call one week later could improve patient compliance. Methods All prescriptions at a primary health care centre in a rural district were written in duplicates during a four weeks period and the copies were compared to the pharmacy's registration of the prescriptions during a successive five weeks period. Within ten days after the GP visit a practice nurse phoned half of the patients asking general questions about the well-being. The very vast majority of patients redeem the prescriptions at a local pharmacy. Results The telephone call significantly increased the visits to the pharmacy. The women visited the pharmacy significantly more than men and they were more influenced by the phone call. Women generally also redeemed more prescriptions. Men have low compliance concerning drugs for cardiovascular diseases. Conclusions A phone call shortly after the GP visit, seem to improve compliance, especially for women. Women redeem prescriptions more than men do. Men with low compliance, i.e men with cardiovascular diseases, ought to be more in focus in compliance research.


, from FoU-centrum för primärvård och folktandvård Södra Älvsborg
http://au.researchweb.org/is/en/foualvsborg/user/publication?ref=1164521